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Glenda Sluga (The University of Sydney/European University Institute) will give the lecture “Women and the History of International Thinking” in the Utrecht/Amsterdam Seminar Global Intellectual History.

Detail Summary
Date 2 February 2021
Engraving from Vincent Levinus's 1715

Abstract

Over the last few decades, historians have reshaped the spatial and conceptual contours of intellectual history.  In particular, the prospect of a global intellectual history has provoked reflection on methods and questions of representativeness that transcend the default national parameters of this sub-field. In my lecture, I want to invite into these historiographical developments the place of women, and a specific international framing of ideas and their agents.  My aim is to outline a history of European “International Thinking” from the turn of the 19th century to the mid-20th century, with women at its centre. I argue that the history of women and international thinking requires us to expand not only where, but who and what counts in intellectual history.

Registration

Register for this online meeting by sending an e-mail to: info@globalintellectualhistory.org

About the Seminar

The Utrecht/Amsterdam Seminar Global Intellectual History is a platform for researchers from different faculties and departments at the University of Amsterdam and Utrecht University who are working in the field of intellectual history and related disciplines. These include, among others, the history of historical, legal and political thought, conceptual history, the social and cultural history of ideas, as well as research at the intersection between intellectual history, institutions, politics, and practices.

Worldwide, intellectual history is moving into new, exciting directions. Tapping into new source materials, covering longer stretches of time, dealing with broader geographical spaces, making comparisons and drawing connections on a global scale, as well as combining established and new (digital) methods, both young and up-coming as well as established experts are in search for new answers – and perhaps more importantly – new questions. The Utrecht/Amsterdam Seminar Global Intellectual History contributes to this development by providing a venue for presenting and discussing frontline research.